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20121006
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)
of government in your life. i would like to know what to think about that. it is a hearty debate it seems this year between the two debates. our lines are open and. -- lines are open. you also send us a message by e- mail. can post on facebook foresees ben. weet.end us fa t what should the role of government be in your life? this story was part of peter baker's coverage of the debate. a clash of philosophies. one side sees the central government role. the other side wanted to get out of the way. is also the subject of a fairly new poll from the gallup group majority in the u.s.a., doing too much. so the majority of americans continue to believe the government is trying to do too many things. that is down from a record high of 61% earlier this summer. but for an 10th said the government should do more to solve the nation's problems. we wanted to turn to you and ask, what you believe the role of the government should be in your life? let us listen to president obama. [video clip] >> the first role is to keep the american people state. that is its most basic function. as commander in chief,
governance survey and are the basis for our discussion for the first 45 minutes of this edition of the "washington journal." good morning. today is saturday, september 29. we want to find out from you about divided government. are you in favor of it? would you prefer to see one party, two parties, three parties? one party versus divided government, your preferences is our topic for the first segment of the program. 202-585-3880 is our number for democrats. republicans can call us at 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. if you're calling outside the u.s., 202-585-3883. we'll show you those numbers throughout the segment. if you want to get in touch with us via social media, the address, twitter, twithtwith cspanwj. on facebook, it's facebook.com/cspan. if you want to send us an email, that address is journal @organize org. -- is journal @c-span.org. this is the gallup poll we're talking about. it's the gallup annual governance survey. they write while americans tend to lean toward one-party government over divided government in presidential election years, this year finds th
announced in advance will be three on the economy, and one each on health care, the role of government, and governing. with an emphasis through out on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy, distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though, as we welcome president obama. and governor romney. [ applause ] >> jim. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? have you two minutes. each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss determined, mr. president, you go first. >> thank you very much, jim, for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of denver for your hospitality, a lot of points i want to make tonight, but the most important one is that 20 yea
on domessic policy, including health care, the role of governments, and the number one issue on voters' minds, the economy. you can expect both candidates to have a say on the 8.1% of the unemployment rate and the national debt. keep in mind with early voting under way in 10 states already, many americans have already cast their ballots. still governor romney and presideet obama have plenty of opportunity to hurt or help their campaign in the next nine minutes. no cheering, no. now, the moderator, jim lehrer of pbs. >> good evening from maaness arena at the university of denver in denver colorado. i am jim lehrer of pbs news hour, and i welcome the new to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president obama, the democratic nominee, and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate and the next three, two presidential, one ice- presidential, are sponsored by the commission of presidential debates. tonight's nine minutes will be about he domestic feature and will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute seg
each on health care, the role of government and the governing with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates also have to- minute closing statements. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] revi >> welcome to you both. let's start with the economy, a segment one. let's start with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes to start. mr. president, you will go first. >> i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. 20 years ago, i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. so i just want to wish, sweetie, you have the anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. [laughter] four years ago, we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depression. millions of jobs were lost. the auto industry was on the brink of collapse. the financial system had frozen up. because of the
will be free on the economy and one each on health care, the role of garment, and governing. there will be an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both will have two-minute closing statements. the audience has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, or other noisy distracting things so we may concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [applause] welcome to you both. let's start with the economy. segment one. let's begin with drops. what are -- let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? you have two minutes each to start. the coin toss has determined that mr. president goes first. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. thank you, governor romney, and the university of denver. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed to marry me. i want to wish you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now we will not be celebrating it
or the candidates. the segments will be three on the economy and one each on health care the role of government, and governing. with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers applause boos hiss among other noisy distracting things, so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception right now, though as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [ cheers and applause ] >> jim. >> gentlemen, welcome to you both. let's start the economy segment 1, and let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about creating new jobs? you have two minutes -- each of you have two minutes to start. a coin toss has been determined mr. president you go first. >> obama: thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to thank governor romney and the university of colorado for your hospitality. 20 years ago i became the luckiest man on earth because michelle obama agreed t
, the role of government, and government, with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates will also have two-minute closing statements. the audience here in the hall has promised to remain silent. no cheers, applause, boos, hisses, among other noisy distracting things, 0 -- so we may all concentrate on what the candidates have to say. there is a noise exception now, though, as we welcome president obama and governor romney. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> welcome to you both. let's start the economy. let's begin with jobs. what are the major differences between the two of you about how you would go about creating new jobs? >> thank you very much. i want to thank the university of denver for your hospitality. there are a lo of -- lot of points i want to make. the first point i would like to make, is 20 years ago, i became the luckyest man on earth because michelle obama married me. i just want you to know, next year we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. four years ago we went through the worst financial crisis since the great depr
captioning sponsored by cbs >> i don't think government can solve all our problems but government's not the source of our problems, either. >> i have a plan. i have five steps that will get this economy going. >> i'm not fighting to create democratic jobs or republican jobs, i'm trying to create american jobs. >> i will not raise taxes on middle-income americans. >> the debates will matter to some undecided voters. >> the debates could decide the election for either one of us. >> from denver, colorado, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. we're about to see the one thing we haven't seen in this long campaign for the presidency-- the candidates side by side. it's the first of three debates between the democratic incumbent-- 51-year-old barack obama-- and his republican challenger 65-year-old mitt romney. it comes 34 days before the election-- though early voting is already under way in many states. the focus tonight is domestic issues, including the economy, still struggling to recover from the great recession. polls show the race is very close nationally, but in swing st
to the failure of, for the federal government to give money to the states in this time of crisis, which president obama supported. but you know, i think you'd see independent women, as i said before, a growing block of women, not just progressives are democrats, democratic women, could you worry about the fact that their daughter, for example, might not have access to planned parenthood, which, by the way, is really about women's health, mammograms, and not just these hot-button issues of reproductive choice. so i do think the independent women voters are the canary in the coal mined in terms of the seeing a republican party that is not hospitable or open to women's health rights, and linked to that in order to control your economic destiny you need to control your health. host: michael is a political science major. >> i will begin with the article that ran on "the nation" frontpage. why have appointments gone by the wayside in this election? guest: president obama has faced obstruction but has not been as engaged with putting forward judges. by the way, the supreme court today may be years 2% of
. one is make the big picture. he's the free enterpriser and president obama is the big government planner. and those are big differences in philosophy in government. two, romney has a tax cut plan. he has a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones
's happened in our government in recent years and has continued up until now is a breakdown in the trust among our people and the -- >> don't adjust your set. this is what it was like live. hold on for just a second. this is what it was like for people watching the debate that night. [ silence ] >> the pool broadcaster from philadelphia have temporarily lost the audio. it is not a conspiracy against governor carter or president ford. they will fix it as soon as possible. >> the pool audio from philadelphia has been lost momentarily. we hope to have it back any minute. we don't know what's happened to it. >> it took 27 minutes to get that sound back. so the first time we had incumbent president face his challenger on tv in a debate in american history, it was totally novel to the country, it had never happened before, and the verdict to the extent that there was any clear winner or not, nobody really seemed to think there was a clear winner. frankly, it was almost beside the point. everybody was distracted with what went wrong, technically, 27 minutes of silence all blamed on this tiny little c
to be put in to a situation where you have a government determining somebody who wants to put the idea up on television can't do that. that's one of the things with the campaign finance is that it's what to nay say about democracy is the worst form of government except for the worst form of government. the campaign finance system may not look perfect. when you look at the alternative i don't know they are god either. i don't know if it's a good to have the department of justice to determine he can't run television ads. ic you should be able to do that. i think it's a first amendment right. when you move to the constitutional right it starts getting ugly. >> yeah. we don't -- even or side there's been money in elections for forever. lots of money. going back as long as with can. we can go back to george washington and the night before. there was tails of flying rum and beer and the voice rang out the day 6 election day. how to they got out of the book. there's been money and things in politics for as long as we know. i don't think either side of a necessarily thinks the money itself and ha
in state government debts as well. now my final number: $50,000 is the median household income. so, we owe $12,000 more than we make. that means as a nation what we owe now exceeds what we have. that also means even if you confiscate all that we make every penny of its you would not come close to covering what we spend, any of it. that is the issue the guys should be hammering tomorrow night, how vulnerable we are. the guy would lays it out would not just be reframing the debate but setting off a firestorm. but one that need not concern him or us. as the fine of the mind in both political parties have told me, and, yes, there are still quite a few, to quote a certain vice presidential candidate, we can do this. listen to two guys on my fox business network show, which if you don't get you should demand, last night, retired democratic senator sam nunn and former republican senator bob bennett appears jointly on fox business network. each offering relatively modest proposals to fix this mess. listen closely. >> we particularly have to discuss, frankly, with the american people, that the enti
've seen so far, indicate about the approach to management and governance. today with a simple and outstanding panel of speakers to help us analyze these questions. jon huntsman is a past presidential candidate, so he has a lot of authenticity to discuss these leadership questions. but if i know anything about the subject matter i wouldn't be here today. [laughter] >> we are still please you are here. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l
passed overwhelmingly by republicans in states with republican legislatures and republican government. that includes efforts to crack down on voter registration drives, to make it harder for people to register by demanding proof of citizenship. that means cutting back on early voting. that requires the government- issued i.d. to cast a ballot. that prevents ex-felons from voting after they served their time. purging the voter rolls. these are all laws that have been passed by republicans and republican states. that is why the article was titled the gop war on voting. tavis: why are the republicans pushing this issue? what is the take away for them? >> if you ask republicans why they are pushing the issue, they will give you a two word response. voter fraud. if you ask me, it is because they looked at the 2008 election and they saw a massive turnout from young voters, hispanics, and african- americans, termed coalition of the ascendant. they said, this cannot happen again. the demographics are changing that if this coalition of the ascendant turns out in the same numbers in 2012 and go
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 234 (some duplicates have been removed)